Course Overview

One reason to study Philosophy and Ethics is because it deals with the big issues in life. What happens when we die? Does God exist? Is it right to kill? What role does morality have in modern society?

Studying and discussing these issues will enable you to improve your thinking skills and ability to develop an argument. You will learn to consider issues, understand how key ideas have developed through the work of philosophers in the past and recognise their influence on ideas in society today in areas such as law, politics, and international relations. You will also reflect upon your own points of view in relation to these ideas.

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Who is this course aimed at?

This course is aimed at students who:

  • Anyone who enjoys discussing contemporary issues of morality, identity, sexuality and euthanasia and wants to improve their thinking skills.

What will you learn?

This course is assessed by exams. You will explore arguments for and against the existence of God and psychological approaches to religious experience. You will look at issues surrounding life after death, scientific challenges to religious belief, evil and suffering and ethical language.  You will examine key moral principles such as sexual identity, war and medical ethics, and look closely at ethical theories around animal rights, meta ethics, free will and responsibility, including the work of the theorists such as Bentham and Kant.

What skills will you develop?

Progression Routes

Skills students will develop on this course include:

  • Critical Thinking 
  • Analysis
  • Written and Verbal Literacy 
  • Meeting Deadlines 
  • Self Confidence 
  • Resilience 
  • Practice 
  • Time Management
  • Research

A Level

Course Leader:
Stephanie Preen

Course Length:
Two Years

Entry Requirements:
GCSE English at Grade 5 or above with an interest in current affairs and an average points score of 4.6 or above.

How is the course assessed:
This course is assessed by exams.